Automating PKS Upgrades

Last night, Pivotal announced new versions of PKS and Harbor, so I thought it’s time to simplify the upgrade process. Here is a concourse pipeline that essentially aggregates the upgrade-tile pipeline so that PKS and Harbor are upgraded in one go.

What it does:

  1. Runs on a schedule – you set the time and days it may run
  2. Downloads the latest version of PKS and Harbor from Pivnet- you set the major.minor version range
  3. Uploads the PKS and Harbor releases to your BOSH director
  4. Determines whether the new release is missing a stemcell, downloads it from PivNet and uploads it to BOSH director
  5. Stages the tiles/releases
  6. Applies changes

What you need:

  1. A working Concourse instance that is able to reach the Internet to pull down the binaries and repo
  2. The fly cli and credentials for your Concourse.
  3. A token from your PivNet account
  4. An instance of PKS 1.0.2 or 1.0.3 AND Harbor 1.4.x deployed on Ops Manager
  5. Credentials for your Ops Manager
  6. (optional) A token from your GitHub account

How to use the pipeline:

  1. Download params.yml and pipeline.yml from here.
  2. Edit the params.yml by replacing the values in double-parentheses with the actual value. Each line has a bit explaining what it’s expecting.  For example, ((ops_mgr_host)) becomes opsmgr.pcf1.domain.local
    • Remove the parens
    • If you have a GitHub Token, pop that value in, otherwise remove ((github_token))
    • The current pks_major_minor_version regex will get the latest 1.0.x.  If you want to pin it to a specific version, or when PKS 1.1.x is available, you can make those changes here.
    • The ops_mgr_usr and ops_mgr_pwd credentials are those you use to logon to Ops Manager itself.  Typically set when the Ops Manager OVA is deployed.
    • The schedule params should be adjusted to a convenient time to apply the upgrade.  Remember that in addition to the PKS Service being offline (it’s a singleton) during the upgrade, your Kubernetes clusters may be affected if you have the “Upgrade all Clusters” errand set to run in the PKS configuration, so schedule wisely!

  3. Open your cli and login to concourse with fly

    fly -t concourse login -c http://concourse.domain.local:8080 -u username -p password

  4. Set the new pipeline. Here, I’m naming the pipeline “PKS_Upgrade”. You’ll pass the pipeline.yml with the “-c” param and your edited params.yml with the “-l” param

    fly -t concourse sp -p PKS_Upgrade -c pipeline.yml -l params.yml

    Answer “y” to “Apply Configuration”…

  5. Unpause the pipeline so it can run when in the scheduled window

    fly -t concourse up -p PKS_Upgrade

  6. Login to the Concourse web to see our shiny new pipeline!

    If you don’t want to deal with the schedule and simply want it to upgrade on-demand, use the pipeline-nosched.yml instead of pipeline.yml, just be aware that when you unpause the pipeline, it’ll start doing its thing.  YMMV, but for me, it took about 8 minutes to complete the upgrade.

Behind the scenes
It’s not immediately obvious how the pipeline does what it does. When I first started out, I found it frustrating that there just isn’t much to the pipeline itself. To that end, I tried making pipelines that were entirely self-contained. This was good in that you can read the pipeline and see everything it’s doing; plus it can be made to run in an air-gapped environment. The downside is that there is no separation, one error in any task and you’ll have to edit the whole pipeline file.
As I learned a little more and poked around in what others were doing, it made sense to split the “tasks” out, keep them in a GitHub public repo and pull it down to run on-demand.

Pipelines generally have two main sections; resources and jobs.
Resources are objects that are used by jobs. In this case, the binary installation files, a zip of the GitHub repo and the schedule are resources.
Jobs are (essentially) made up of plans and plans have tasks.
Each task in most pipelines uses another source yml. This task.yml will indicate which image concourse should build a container from and what it should do on that container (typically, run a script). All of these task components are in the GitHub repo, so when the pipeline job runs, it clones the repo and runs the appropriate task script in a container built on an image pulled from dockerhub.

More info
I’ve got a several pipelines in the repo.   Some of them do what they’re supposed to. 🙂 Most of them are derived from others’ work, so many thanks to Pivotal Services and Sabha Parameswaran

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PKS and NSX-T: I did everything wrong

I’ve fought with PKS and NSX-T for a month or so now. I’ll admit it: I did everything wrong, several times. One thing for certain, I know how NOT to configure it. So, now that I’ve finally gotten past my configuration issues, it makes sense to share the pain lessons learned.

  1. Set your expectations correctly. PKS is literally a 1.0 product right now. It’s getting a lot of attention and will make fantastic strides very quickly, but for now, it can be cumbersome and confusing. The documentation is still pretty raw. Similarly, NSX-T is very young. The docs are constantly referring you to the REST API instead of the GUI – this is fine of course, but is a turn-off for many. The GUI has many weird quirks. (when entering a tag, you’ll have to tab off of the value field after entering a value, since it is only checked onBlur)
  2. Use Chrome Incognito  NSX-T does not work in Firefox on Windows. It works in Chrome, but I had issues where the cache would problems (the web GUI would indicate that backup is not configured until I closed Chrome, cleared cache and logged in again)
  3. Do not use exclamation point in the NSX-T admin password Yep, learned that the hard way. Supposedly, this is resolved in PKS 1.0.3, but I’m not convinced as my environment did not wholly cooperate until I reset the admin password to something without an exclamation point in it
  4. Tag only one IP Pool with ncp/external I needed to build out several foundations on this environment and wanted to keep them in discrete IP space by created multiple “external IP Pools” and assigning each to its own foundation. Currently the nsx-cli.sh script that accompanies PKS with NSX-T only looks for the “ncp/external” tag on IP Pools, if more than one is found, it quits. I suppose you could work around this by forking the script and passing an additional “cluster” param, but I’m certain that the NSBU is working on something similar
  5. Do not take a snapshot of the NSX Manager This applies to NSX for vSphere and NSX-T, but I have made this mistake and it was costly. If your backup solution relies on snapshots (pretty much all of them do), be sure to exclude the NSX Manager and…
  6. Configure scheduled backups of NSX Manager I found the docs for this to be rather obtuse. Spent a while trying to configure a FileZilla SFTP or even IIS-FTP server until it finally dawned on me that it really is just FTP over SSH. So, the missing detail for me was that you’ll just need a linux machine with plenty of space that the NSX Manager can connect to – over SSH – and dump files to. I started with this procedure, but found that the permissions were too restrictive.
  7. Use concourse pipelines This was an opportunity for me to really dig into concourse pipelines and embrace what can be done. One moment of frustration came when PKS 1.0.3 was released and I discovered that the parameters for vSphere authentication had changed. In PKS 1.0 through 1.0.2, there was a single set of credentials to be used by PKS to communicate with vCenter Server. As of 1.0.3, this was split into credentials for master and credentials for workers. So, the pipeline needed a tweak in order to complete the install. I ended up putting in a conditional to check the release version, so the right params are populated. If interested, my pipelines can be found at https://github.com/BrianRagazzi/concourse-pipelines
  8. Count your Load-Balancers In NSX-T, the load-balancers can be considered a sort of empty appliance that Virtual Servers are attached to and can itself attach to a Logical Router. The load-balancers in-effect require pre-allocated resources that must come from an Edge Cluster. The “small” load-balancer consumes 2 CPU and 4GB RAM and the “Large” edge VM provides 8 CPU and 16GB RAM. So, a 2-node Edge Cluster can support up to FOUR active/standby Load-Balancers. This quickly becomes relevant when you realize that PKS creates a new load-balancer when a new K8s cluster is created. If you get errors in the diego databse with the ncp job when creating your fifth k8s cluster, you might need to add a few more edge nodes to the edge cluster.
  9. Configure your NAT rules as narrow as you can. I wasted a lot of time due to mis-configured NAT rules. The log data from provisioning failures did not point to NAT mis-configuration, so wild geese were chased.  Here’s what finally worked for me:
    Router Priority Action Source Destination Translated Description
    Tier1 PKS Management 512 No NAT [PKS Management CIDR] [PKS Service CIDR] Any No NAT between management and services
    [PKS Service CIDR] [PKS Management CIDR]
    1024 DNAT Any [External IP for Ops Manager] [Internal IP for Ops Manager] So Ops Manager is reachable
    [External IP for PKS Service] [Internal IP for PKS Service] (obtain from Status tab of PKS in Ops Manager) So PKS Service (and UAA) is reachable
    SNAT [Internal IP for PKS Service] Any [External IP for PKS Service] Return Traffic for PKS Service
    2048 [PKS Management CIDR] [Infrastructure CIDR] (vCenter Server, NSX Manager, DNS Servers) [External IP for Ops Manager] So PKS Management can reach infrastructure
    [PKS Management CIDR] [Additional Infrastructure] (NTP in this case) [External IP for Ops Manager]
    Tier1 PKS Services 512 No NAT [PKS Service CIDR] [PKS Management CIDR] Any No NAT between management and services
    [PKS Management CIDR] [PKS Service CIDR]
    1024 SNAT [PKS Service CIDR] [Infrastructure CIDR] (vCenter Server, NSX Manager, DNS Servers) [External IP] (not the same as Ops Manager and PKS Service, but in the same L3 network) So PKS Services can reach infrastructure
    [PKS Service CIDR] [Additional Infrastructure] (NTP in this case) [External IP]

Replacing the self-signed Certificate on NSX-T

Ran into a difficulty trying to use the self-signed certificate that comes pre-configured on the manager for NSX-T. In my case, Pivotal Operations Manager refused to accept the self-signed certificate.

So, for NSX-T 2.1, it looks like the procedure is:

    1. Log on to the NSX Manager and navigate to System|Trust
    2. Click CSRs tab and then “Generate CSR”, populate the certificate request details and click Save
    3. Select the new CSR and click Actions|Download CSR PEM to save the exported CSR in PEM format
    4. Submit the CSR to your CA to get it signed and save the new certificate. Be sure to save the root CA and any subordinate CA certificates too<. In this example, certnew.cer is the signed NSX Manager certificate, sub-CA.cer is the subordinate CA certificate and root-CA.cer is the Root CA certificate
    5. Open the two (or three) cer files in notepad or notepad++ and concatenate them in order of leaf cert, (subordinate CA cert), root CA cert
    6. Back in NSX Manager, select the CSR and click Actions|Import Certificate for CSR. In the Window, paste in the concatenated certificates from above and click save
    7. Now you’ll have a new certificate and CA certs listed under Certificates. The GUI only shows a portion of the ID by default, click it to display the full ID and copy it to the clip board
    8. Launch RESTClient in Firefox.
      • Click Authentication|Basic Authentication and enter the NSX Manager credentials for Username and Password, click “Okay”
      • For the URL, enter https://<NSX Manager IP or FQDN>api/v1/node/services/http?action=apply_certificate&certificate_id=<certificate ID copied in previous step>
      • Set the method to POST and click SEND button
      • check the Headers to confirm that the status code is 200
    9. Refresh browser session to NSX Manager GUI to confirm new certificate is in use

Notes:
I was concerned that replacing the certificate would break the components registered via the certificate thumbprint; this process does not break those things. They remain registered and trust the new certificate

BOSH Stemcell 3541.2 breaks Concourse 3.9.0

02/22/2018 Comments off

Looks like there was a breaking change in stemcell v3541.2 where the default umask was set to 077.  If this stemcell is used with BOSH-deployed-Concourse.CI v3.9.0, resource checking fails with a “permission denied” error.

Note that Pivotal (as of Feb 22 2018)  has not updated their stemcells to 3541.x and their latest is still in the 3468 chain.

 

Resolutions for 2018

12/23/2017 Comments off

If I put it here, I’m much more likely to follow-through.  Like many, I work best under some pressure.  Here is a list of what I want to do differently (with regard to technology) next year.

  1. Do more blogging.  I can make a ton of excuses for not blogging as much this year.  I love sharing what I’ve learned; the more new stuff I learn, the more I share.  So….
  2. Do more for NSX for vSphere and NSX-T.  I feel strongly that SDN is critical to the future of how datacenters operate.  NSX is the logical leader in this space and will only grow in interest.  There is still a tendency to replicate what was done with pre-SDN technology and I’d like to see modern ways to solve problems while finding and pushing the limits of what can be done in SDN.
  3. PKS
    Do more with containers and PKS.  The technologies that Pivotal provides are cutting edge.  Already and continuing, containers and applications-as-code methods are growing and will define the datacenter of the future.  Just as a few years ago, we stopped thinking of hardware servers as single-purpose, we’ll embrace multiple workloads within a VM.
  4. Do more coding.  I love concourse and pipelines, but have a lot to learn.  Let’s find the limits of BOSH and pipelines.  Can we not only deploy, but automate the operation and maintenance of a PaaS solution?
  5. Do more coding.  I feel that as we move to “applications-as-code”, it’s important to understand what that means to developers and operators.  What sort of problems become irrelevant in this approach?  What molehills become mountains?

Hope to see you next year!

 

Removing NSX-T VIBs from ESXi hosts

10/31/2017 Comments off

I’d wanted to revert my environment from (an incomplete install of) NSX-T v2.0 back to NSX for vSphere v6.3.x, but found that the hosts would not complete preparation.  The logs indicated that something was “claimed by multiple non-overlay vibs”.

Error in esxupdate.log

I found that the hosts still had the NSX-T VIBs loaded, so to remove them, here’s what I did:

  1. Put the host in maintenance mode.  This is necessary to “de-activate” the VIBs that may be in use
  2. Login to the host via SSH
  3. Run

    /etc/init.d/netcpad stop
    /etc/init.d/nsx-ctxteng stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-da stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-datapath stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-exporter stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-hyperbus stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-lldp stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-mpa stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-nestdb stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-platform-client stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-sfhc stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsx-support-bundle-client stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsxa stop remove
    /etc/init.d/nsxcli stop remove

  4. Run this all in one line; note the the order of the vibs is important

    esxcli software vib remove -n nsx-ctxteng -n nsx-hyperbus -n nsx-platform-client -n nsx-nestdb -n nsx-aggservice -n nsx-da -n nsx-esx-datapath -n nsx-exporter -n nsx-host -n nsx-lldp -n nsx-mpa -n nsx-netcpa -n nsx-python-protobuf -n nsx-sfhc -n nsx-support-bundle-client -n nsxa -n nsxcli -n nsx-common-libs -n nsx-metrics-libs -n nsx-nestdb-libs -n nsx-rpc-libs -n nsx-shared-libs -n nsx-python-gevent -n nsx-python-greenlet

  5. reboot the host

Building Stand-Alone BOSH and Concourse

07/17/2017 Comments off

This should be the last “how to install concourse” post; With this, I think I’ve covered all the interesting ways to install it.  Using BOSH is by-far my favorite approach.  After this, I hope to post more related to the use of concourse and pipelines.

Overview

There are three phases to this deployment:

  1. BOSH-start – We’ll set up an ubuntu VM to create the BOSH director from.  We’ll be using BOSH v2 and not bosh-init
  2. BOSH Director – This does all the work for us, but has to be instructed how to connect to vSphere
  3. Concourse – We’ll use a deployment manifest in BOSH to deploy concourse

I took the approach that – where possible – I would manually download the files and transfer them to the target, rather than having the install process pull the files down automatically.  In my case, I went through a lot of trial-and-error, so I did not want to pull down the files every time.  In addition, I’d like to get a feel for what a self-contained (no Internet access) solution would look like. BTW, concourse requires Internet access in order to get to docker hub for a container to run its pipelines.

Starting position

Make sure you have the following:

  • Working vSphere environment with some available storage and compute capacity
  • At least one network on a vSwitch or Distributed vSwitch with available IP addresses
  • Account for BOSH to connect to vSphere with permissions to create folders, resource pools, and VMs
  • An Ubuntu  VM template.  Mine is 16.04 LTS
  • PuTTY, Win-SCP or similar tools

BOSH-start

  1. Deploy a VM from your Ubuntu template.  Give it a name – I call mine BOSH-start – and IP address, power it on.  In my case, I’m logged in as my account to avoid using root unless necessary.
  2. Install dependencies:
    sudo apt-get install -y build-essential zlibc zlib1g-dev ruby ruby-dev openssl \
    libxslt-dev libxml2-dev libssl-dev libreadline6 libreadline6-dev \
    libyaml-dev libsqlite3-dev sqlite3
  3. Download BOSH CLI v2, make it executable and move it to the path.  Get the latest version of the BOSH v2 CLI here.
    wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/bosh-cli-artifacts/bosh-cli-2.0.16-linux-amd64
    chmod +x ~/Downloads/bosh-cli-*
    sudo mv ~/Downloads/bosh-cli-* /usr/local/bin/bosh

BOSH Director

  1. Git Director templates
    mkdir ~/bosh-1
    cd ~/bosh-1
    git clone https://github.com/cloudfoundry/bosh-deployment
  2. Create a folder and use bosh to create the environment.  This command will create several “state” files and our BOSH director with the information you provide.  Replace the values in red with your own.
    
    bosh create-env bosh-deployment/bosh.yml \
        --state=state.json \
        --vars-store=creds.yml \
        -o bosh-deployment/vsphere/cpi.yml \
        -o bosh-deployment/vsphere/resource-pool.yml \
        -o bosh-deployment/misc/dns.yml \
        -v internal_dns=<DNS Servers ex: [192.168.100.10,192.168.100.11]>
        -v director_name=<name of BOSH director. eg:boshdir> \
        -v internal_cidr=<CIDR for network ex: 172.16.9.0/24> \
        -v internal_gw=<Gateway Address> \
        -v internal_ip=<IP Address to assign to BOSH director> \
        -v network_name="<vSphere vSwitch Port Group>" \
        -v vcenter_dc=<vSphere Datacenter> \
        -v vcenter_ds=<vSphere Datastore> \
        -v vcenter_ip=<IP address of vCenter Server> \
        -v vcenter_user=<username for connecting to vCenter Server> \
        -v vcenter_password=<password for that account> \
        -v vcenter_templates=<location for templates ex:/BOSH/templates> \
        -v vcenter_vms=<location for VM.  ex:/BOSH/vms> \
        -v vcenter_disks=<folder on datastore for bosh disks.  ex:bosh-1-disks> \
        -v vcenter_cluster=<vCenter Cluster Name> \
        -v vcenter_rp=<Resource Pool Name>

    One note here; if you do not add the line for dns.yml and internal_dns, your BOSH director will use 8.8.8.8 as its DNS server and won’t be able to find anything internal. This will take a little while to download the bits and set up the Director for you.

  3. Connect to Director.  The following commands will create an alias for the new BOSH environment named “bosh-1”. Replace 10.0.0.6 with the IP of your BOSH Director from the create-env command:
    # Configure local alias
    bosh alias-env bosh-1 -e 10.0.0.6 --ca-cert <(bosh int ./creds.yml --path /director_ssl/ca)
    export BOSH_CLIENT=admin
    export BOSH_CLIENT_SECRET=`bosh int ./creds.yml --path /admin_password`
    bosh -e bosh-1 env
  4. Next we’ll need a “cloud config”.  This indicates to BOSH Director how to configure the CPI for interaction with vSphere.  You can find examples and details here.  For expediency, What I ended up with is below. As usual, you’ll want to update the values in red to match your environment.  Save this file as ~/bosh-1/cloud-config.yml on the BOSH-start VM
    azs:
    - name: z1
      cloud_properties:
        datacenters:
        - name: <vSphere Datacenter Name>
        - clusters: 
          - <vSphere Cluster Name>: {resource_pool: <Resource Pool in that cluster>}
    properties:
      vcenter:
        address: <IP of FQDN of vCenter Server>
        user: <account to connect to vSphere with>
        password: <Password for that account>
        default_disk_type: thin
        enable_auto_anti_affinity_drs_rules: false
        datacenters:
        - name: <vSphere Datacenter Name>
          vm_folder: /BOSH/vms
          template_folder: /BOSH/templates
          disk_path: prod-disks
          datastore_pattern: <regex filter for datastores to use ex: '\AEQL-THICK0\d' >
          persistent_datastore_pattern: <regex filter for datastores to use ex: '\AEQL-THICK0\d' >
          clusters:
          - <vSphere Cluster Name>: {resource_pool: <Resource Pool in that cluster>}
    
    vm_types:
    - name: default
      cloud_properties:
        cpu: 2
        ram: 4096
        disk: 16_384
    - name: large
      cloud_properties:
        cpu: 2
        ram: 8192
        disk: 32_768
    
    disk_types:
    - name: default
      disk_size: 16_384
      cloud_properties:
        type: thin
    - name: large
      disk_size: 32_768
      cloud_properties:
        type: thin
    
    networks:
    - name: default
      type: manual
      subnets:
      - range: <network CIDR where to place VMs ex:192.168.10.0/26>
        reserved: <reserved range in that CIDR ex:[192.168.10.1-192.168.10.42] >
        gateway: <gateway address for that network>
        az: z1
        dns: <DNS Server IPs ex: [192.168.100.50,192.168.100.150] >
        cloud_properties:
          name: <name of port group to attach created VMs to>
    
    compilation:
      workers: 5
      reuse_compilation_vms: true
      az: z1
      vm_type: large
      network: default
    
    
  5. Update Cloud Config with our file:
    bosh -e bosh-1 update-cloud-config ./cloud-config

    This is surprisingly fast.  You should now have a functional BOSH Director.

Concourse

Let’s deploy something with BOSH!

Prereqs:

  • Copy the URLs for the Concourse and Garden runC BOSH releases from here
  • Copy the URL for the latest Ubuntu Trusty stemcell for vSphere from here
  1. Upload Stemcell.  You’ll see it create a VM with a name beginning with “sc” in vSphere
    bosh -e bosh-1 upload-stemcell <URL to stemcell>
  2. Upload Garden runC release to BOSH
    bosh -e bosh-1 upload-release <URL to garden-runc tgz>
  3. Upload Concourse release to BOSH
    bosh -e bosh-1 upload-release <URL to concourse tgz>
  4. A BOSH deployment must have a stemcell, a release and a manifest.  You can get a concourse manifest from here, or start with the one I’m using.  You’ll notice that a lot of the values here must match those in our cloud-config.  Save the concourse manifest as ~/concourse.yml
    ---
    name: concourse
    
    releases:
    - name: concourse
      version: latest
    - name: garden-runc
      version: latest
    
    stemcells:
    - alias: trusty
      os: ubuntu-trusty
      version: latest
    
    instance_groups:
    - name: web
      instances: 1
      # replace with a VM type from your BOSH Director's cloud config
      vm_type: default
      stemcell: trusty
      azs: [z1]
      networks: [{name: default}]
      jobs:
      - name: atc
        release: concourse
        properties:
          # replace with your CI's externally reachable URL, e.g. https://ci.foo.com
          external_url: http://concourse.mydomain.com
    
          # replace with username/password, or configure GitHub auth
          basic_auth_username: myuser
          basic_auth_password: mypass
    
          postgresql_database: &atc_db atc
      - name: tsa
        release: concourse
        properties: {}
    
    - name: db
      instances: 1
      # replace with a VM type from your BOSH Director's cloud config
      vm_type: large
      stemcell: trusty
      # replace with a disk type from your BOSH Director's cloud config
      persistent_disk_type: default
      azs: [z1]
      networks: [{name: default}]
      jobs:
      - name: postgresql
        release: concourse
        properties:
          databases:
          - name: *atc_db
            # make up a role and password
            role: atc_db
            password: mypass
    
    - name: worker
      instances: 1
      # replace with a VM type from your BOSH Director's cloud config
      vm_type: default
      stemcell: trusty
      azs: [z1]
      networks: [{name: default}]
      jobs:
      - name: groundcrew
        release: concourse
        properties: {}
      - name: baggageclaim
        release: concourse
        properties: {}
      - name: garden
        release: garden-runc
        properties:
          garden:
            listen_network: tcp
            listen_address: 0.0.0.0:7777
    
    update:
      canaries: 1
      max_in_flight: 1
      serial: false
      canary_watch_time: 1000-60000
      update_watch_time: 1000-60000

    A couple of notes:

    • The Worker instance will need plenty of space, especially if you’re planning to use PCF Pipeline Automation, as it’ll have to download the massive binaries from PivNet. You’ll want to make sure that you have a sufficiently large vm type defined in your cloud config and assigned as worker in the Concourse manifest
  5. Now, we have everything we need to deploy concourse.  Notice that we’re using BOSH v2 and the deployment syntax is a little different than in BOSH v1.  This command will create a handful of VMs, compile a bunch of packages and push them to the VMs.  You’ll a couple extra IPs for the compilation VMs – these will go away after the deployment is complete.
    bosh -e bosh-1 -d concourse deploy ./concourse.yml
  6. Odds are that you’ll have to make adjustments to the cloud-config and deployment manifest.  If so, you can easily apply updates to the cloud-config with the bosh update-cloud-config command.
  7. If the deployment is completely hosed up and you need to remove it, you can do so with
    bosh -e bosh-1 -d concourse stop &&  bosh -e bosh-1 -d concourse deld

Try it out

  1. Get the IP address of the web instance by running
    bosh -e bosh-1 vms

    From the results, identify the IP address of the web instance:

  2. Point your browser to http://<IP of web instance>:8080
  3. Click Login, Select “main” team and login with the username and password (myuser and mypass in the example) you used in the manifest

References: