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Posts Tagged ‘NSX Pivotal’

PKS and NSX-T: I did everything wrong

I’ve fought with PKS and NSX-T for a month or so now. I’ll admit it: I did everything wrong, several times. One thing for certain, I know how NOT to configure it. So, now that I’ve finally gotten past my configuration issues, it makes sense to share the pain lessons learned.

  1. Set your expectations correctly. PKS is literally a 1.0 product right now. It’s getting a lot of attention and will make fantastic strides very quickly, but for now, it can be cumbersome and confusing. The documentation is still pretty raw. Similarly, NSX-T is very young. The docs are constantly referring you to the REST API instead of the GUI – this is fine of course, but is a turn-off for many. The GUI has many weird quirks. (when entering a tag, you’ll have to tab off of the value field after entering a value, since it is only checked onBlur)
  2. Use Chrome Incognito  NSX-T does not work in Firefox on Windows. It works in Chrome, but I had issues where the cache would problems (the web GUI would indicate that backup is not configured until I closed Chrome, cleared cache and logged in again)
  3. Do not use exclamation point in the NSX-T admin password Yep, learned that the hard way. Supposedly, this is resolved in PKS 1.0.3, but I’m not convinced as my environment did not wholly cooperate until I reset the admin password to something without an exclamation point in it
  4. Tag only one IP Pool with ncp/external I needed to build out several foundations on this environment and wanted to keep them in discrete IP space by created multiple “external IP Pools” and assigning each to its own foundation. Currently the nsx-cli.sh script that accompanies PKS with NSX-T only looks for the “ncp/external” tag on IP Pools, if more than one is found, it quits. I suppose you could work around this by forking the script and passing an additional “cluster” param, but I’m certain that the NSBU is working on something similar
  5. Do not take a snapshot of the NSX Manager This applies to NSX for vSphere and NSX-T, but I have made this mistake and it was costly. If your backup solution relies on snapshots (pretty much all of them do), be sure to exclude the NSX Manager and…
  6. Configure scheduled backups of NSX Manager I found the docs for this to be rather obtuse. Spent a while trying to configure a FileZilla SFTP or even IIS-FTP server until it finally dawned on me that it really is just FTP over SSH. So, the missing detail for me was that you’ll just need a linux machine with plenty of space that the NSX Manager can connect to – over SSH – and dump files to. I started with this procedure, but found that the permissions were too restrictive.
  7. Use concourse pipelines This was an opportunity for me to really dig into concourse pipelines and embrace what can be done. One moment of frustration came when PKS 1.0.3 was released and I discovered that the parameters for vSphere authentication had changed. In PKS 1.0 through 1.0.2, there was a single set of credentials to be used by PKS to communicate with vCenter Server. As of 1.0.3, this was split into credentials for master and credentials for workers. So, the pipeline needed a tweak in order to complete the install. I ended up putting in a conditional to check the release version, so the right params are populated. If interested, my pipelines can be found at https://github.com/BrianRagazzi/concourse-pipelines
  8. Count your Load-Balancers In NSX-T, the load-balancers can be considered a sort of empty appliance that Virtual Servers are attached to and can itself attach to a Logical Router. The load-balancers in-effect require pre-allocated resources that must come from an Edge Cluster. The “small” load-balancer consumes 2 CPU and 4GB RAM and the “Large” edge VM provides 8 CPU and 16GB RAM. So, a 2-node Edge Cluster can support up to FOUR active/standby Load-Balancers. This quickly becomes relevant when you realize that PKS creates a new load-balancer when a new K8s cluster is created. If you get errors in the diego databse with the ncp job when creating your fifth k8s cluster, you might need to add a few more edge nodes to the edge cluster.
  9. Configure your NAT rules as narrow as you can. I wasted a lot of time due to mis-configured NAT rules. The log data from provisioning failures did not point to NAT mis-configuration, so wild geese were chased.  Here’s what finally worked for me:
    Router Priority Action Source Destination Translated Description
    Tier1 PKS Management 512 No NAT [PKS Management CIDR] [PKS Service CIDR] Any No NAT between management and services
    [PKS Service CIDR] [PKS Management CIDR]
    1024 DNAT Any [External IP for Ops Manager] [Internal IP for Ops Manager] So Ops Manager is reachable
    [External IP for PKS Service] [Internal IP for PKS Service] (obtain from Status tab of PKS in Ops Manager) So PKS Service (and UAA) is reachable
    SNAT [Internal IP for PKS Service] Any [External IP for PKS Service] Return Traffic for PKS Service
    2048 [PKS Management CIDR] [Infrastructure CIDR] (vCenter Server, NSX Manager, DNS Servers) [External IP for Ops Manager] So PKS Management can reach infrastructure
    [PKS Management CIDR] [Additional Infrastructure] (NTP in this case) [External IP for Ops Manager]
    Tier1 PKS Services 512 No NAT [PKS Service CIDR] [PKS Management CIDR] Any No NAT between management and services
    [PKS Management CIDR] [PKS Service CIDR]
    1024 SNAT [PKS Service CIDR] [Infrastructure CIDR] (vCenter Server, NSX Manager, DNS Servers) [External IP] (not the same as Ops Manager and PKS Service, but in the same L3 network) So PKS Services can reach infrastructure
    [PKS Service CIDR] [Additional Infrastructure] (NTP in this case) [External IP]
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