Retrieving the Admin Password for Harbor Image Registry in Tanzu Kubernetes Grid Service

In TKGS on vSphere 7.0 through (at least) 7.0.1d, a Harbor Image Registry may be enabled for the vSphere Cluster (Under Configure|Namespaces| Image Registry). This feature currently (as of 7.0.1d) requires the Pod Service, which in turn requires NSX-T integration.

As of 7.0.1d, the self-signed certificate created for this instance of Harbor is added to the trust for nodes in TKG clusters, making it easier (possible?) to use images from Harbor.

When you login to harbor as a user, you’ll notice that the menu is very sparse. Only the ‘admin’ account can access the “Administration” menu.

To get logged in as the ‘admin’ account, we’ll need to retrieve the password from a secret for the harbor controller in the Supervisor cluster.

Steps:

  • SSH into the vCenter Server as root, type ‘shell’ to get to bash shell
  • Type ‘/usr/lib/vmware-wcp/decryptK8Pwd.py‘ to return information about the Supervisor Cluster. The results include the IP for the cluster as well as the node root password
  • While still in the SSH session on the vCenter Server, ssh into the Supervisor Custer node by entering ‘ssh root@<IP address from above>’. For the password, enter the PWD value from above.
  • Now, we have a session as root on a supervisor cluster control plane node.
  • Enter ‘kubectl get ns‘ to see a list of namespaces in the supervisor cluster. You’ll see a number of hidden, system namespaces in addition to those corresponding to the vSphere namespaces. Notice there is a namespace named “vmware-system-registry” in addition to one named “vmware-system-registry-#######”. The namespace with the number is where Harbor is installed.
  • Run ‘kubectl get secret -n vmware-system-registry-######‘ to get a list of secrets in the namespace. Locate the secret named “harbor-######-controller-registry”.
  • Run this to return the decoded admin password: kubectl get secret -n vmware-system-registry-###### harbor-######-controller.data.harborAdminPassword}' | base64 -d | base64 -d
  • In the cases I seen so far, the password is about 16 characters long, if it’s longer than that, you may not have decoded it entirely. Note that the value must be decoded twice.
  • Once you’ve saved the password, enter “exit” three times to get out of the ssh sessions.

Notes

  • Don’t manipulate the authentication settings
  • The process above is not supported; VMware GSS will not help you complete these steps
  • Some features may remain disabled (vulnerability scanning for example)
  • As admin, you may configure registries and replication (although it’s probably unsupported with this built-in version of Harbor for now)